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Cancer Screening

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Referrals & Appointments

Mammography
630-527-3200
CT Lung Scan
630-646-6119
Appointments
630-527-3788

Just as your know your car's mileage and regular maintenance schedule, you need to know your potential risk for cancer and other health problems. Regular check-ups and recognizing symptoms are important steps in detecting cancer. But practicing routine cancer screening is vital. Screening tests are used to identify a specific disease that may be previously unrecognized.

We offer many cancer screenings to help you detect your potential risk for cancer. Read more about our Cancer Screenings for Women and Cancer Screenings for Men.

Lung Cancer Screening Program

Edward Cancer Center offers a CT Lung Screening for at risk patients. This lung screening, designed to assist in early detection, can give those at risk the opportunity for a healthier lifestyle. Learn more about who should have a CT Lung Screen and more about the procedure.

Edward offers imaging and lab Services at Edward Hospital and Edward Heart Hospital in Naperville, and at many convenient locations close to home. Learn more about diagnostic testing for cancer here.

Cancer Screenings for Women

Clinical breast exam
An exam of the breast by a doctor or other health professional. The doctor will carefully feel the breasts and under the arms for lumps or anything else that seems unusual.  
 
How to perform a breast self-exam (BSE):

Lie down and place a small pillow or folded towel under your right shoulder. Put your right hand behind your head. Place your left hand on the upper portion of your right breast with fingers together and flat.

  • Think of your breast as a face on a clock. Start at 12 o'clock and move toward 1 o'clock in small circular motions. Continue around the entire circle until you reach 12 o'clock again.
  • Keep your fingers flat and in constant contact with your breast. When the circle is complete, move in one inch toward the nipple and complete another circle around the clock.
  • Continue in this pattern until you've felt the entire breast. Make sure to feel outer areas that extend into your armpit.
  • Place your fingers flat and directly on top of your nipple. Feel beneath the nipple (and press your nipple inward) and feel for any changes.
  • Repeat on other side.

Colonoscopy
A test that examines the interior lining of your large intestine (rectum and colon) through a thin, flexible viewing instrument called a colonoscope. A colonoscopy helps detect ulcers, polyps, tumors, and areas of inflammation or bleeding.  Click here to learn more.
 
Digital rectal exam
A test to examine abnormalities in the female reproductive system. A doctor usually conducts the test during the annual ob/gyn visit.  Click here for more information about this exam.
 
Mammogram
An X-ray of the breast used to detect tumors that are too small to feel.  Click here for details on mammograms.
 
Pelvic exam
An exam used to look at a woman's uterus, cervix, fallopian tubes, ovaries, bladder, and rectum. A Pap exam (or Pap smear) is usually included. Click here to learn more.
 
Skin self-exam
What to look for: 

  • Any change in a mole, including size, shape, color, soreness, or pain
  • A bleeding mole
  • A discolored area under a fingernail or toenail not caused by injury
  • A general darkening of the skin unrelated to sun exposure

For more information on skin self-exam and types of skin cancer, click here.

Stool guaiac
A test that detects blood in the stool (a common symptom of intestinal or colon cancer) by examining a small sample of stool on a chemically treated card, pad, or wipe.  Learn more about this exam. 

Cancer Screenings for Men 

Colonoscopy
A test that examines the interior lining of your large intestine (rectum and colon) through a thin, flexible viewing instrument called a colonoscope. A colonoscopy helps detect ulcers, polyps, tumors, and areas of inflammation or bleeding.  Click here to learn more.
 
Digital rectal exam
A test, performed by a physician, to examine abnormalities in the prostate. Click here for more information about this exam.

Prostate-specific antigen test
A test that measures the amount of prostate-specific antigen in the blood, which may indicate prostate cancer. Learn more about this exam.
 
Skin self-exam
What to look for:

  • Any change in a mole, including size, shape, color, soreness, or pain
  • A bleeding mole
  • A discolored area under a fingernail or toenail not caused by injury
  • A general darkening of the skin unrelated to sun exposure

For more information on skin self-exam and types of skin cancer, click here.

Stool guaiac
A test that detects blood in the stool (a common symptom of intestinal or colon cancer) by examining a small sample of stool on a chemically treated card, pad, or wipe. Learn more about this exam.
 
How to perform a testicular self-exam (TSE)
TSE is best performed after a bath or shower, when the scrotal muscles are warm and relaxed.   

  • Stand and place the right leg on an elevated surface. Gently feel the scrotal sac until you locate the right testicle.
  • Feel the entire surface and explore the surface for lumps. The skin over the testicle moves freely, making it easy to feel the entire surface of the testicle.
  • Repeat the process for the left testicle.

Click here for more information on TSE.




 

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Edward Hospital & Health Services
801 S. Washington, Naperville, IL 60540 • (630) 527-3000

Naperville • Plainfield • Bolingbrook • Oswego • Woodridge
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