DCSIMG
For Employees Nav Spacer For Providers
click to access MyChart!
EDWARD Hospital and Health Services


Related Links

PrintEmail
Share
Search Health Information   
 

Amylase - urine

Definition

This is a test that measures the amount of amylase in urine. Amylase is an enzyme that helps digest carbohydrates. It is produced mainly in the pancreas and the glands that make saliva.

Amylase may also be measured with a blood test. See: Amylase - blood

How the test is performed

A urine sample is needed. The test may be performed using a single urine sample or a 24-hour urine collection. For information on how to collect a sample, see:

How to prepare for the test

Your health care provider may tell you to stop taking certain drugs that can affect test results. Drugs that can increase amylase levels include:

  • Asparaginase
  • Aspirin
  • Birth control pills
  • Cholinergic drugs
  • Codeine
  • Corticosteroids
  • Indomethacin
  • Loop and thiazide diuretics
  • Methyldopa
  • Morphine
  • Pentazocine

How the test will feel

The test involves only normal urination, and there is no discomfort.

Why the test is performed

This test is done to diagnose pancreatitis and other diseases that affect the pancreas. Your doctor may also order this test to see how treatment for such conditions is working.

Normal Values

The normal range is 2.6 to 21.2 international units per hour (IU/h).

Normal value ranges may vary slightly among different laboratories. Talk to your doctor about the meaning of your specific test results.

The examples above show the common measurements for results for these tests. Some laboratories use different measurements or may test different specimens.

What abnormal results mean

An increased amount of amylase in the urine is called amylasuria. Increased amylase levels may be a sign of:

Decreased amylase levels may be due to:

What the risks are

There are no risks.

References

Owyang C. Pancreatitis. In: Goldman L, Ausiello D, eds. Cecil Medicine. 23rd ed. Philadelphia, Pa: Saunders Elsevier; 2007:chap 147.

Tenner S, Steinberg WM. Acute pancreatitis. In: Feldman M, Friedman LS, Brandt LJ, eds. Sleisenger and Fordtran's Gastrointestinal and Liver Disease. 9th ed. Philadelphia, Pa: Saunders Elsevier; 2010:chap 58.


Review Date: 6/1/2011
Reviewed By: David C. Dugdale, III, MD, Professor of Medicine, Division of General Medicine, Department of Medicine, University of Washington School of Medicine. Also reviewed by David Zieve, MD, MHA, Medical Director, A.D.A.M., Inc.
The information provided herein should not be used during any medical emergency or for the diagnosis or treatment of any medical condition. A licensed medical professional should be consulted for diagnosis and treatment of any and all medical conditions. Call 911 for all medical emergencies. Links to other sites are provided for information only -- they do not constitute endorsements of those other sites. © 1997- A.D.A.M., Inc. Any duplication or distribution of the information contained herein is strictly prohibited.
adam.com
 



 

(630) 527-3000

Follow Us

Facebook twitter Google Plus YouTube Pinterest Instagram LinkedIn




 

Donate Today


Receive our HealthAware eNewsletter, designed to start a conversation about you and your family's health.


Sign Up

Edward Hospital & Health Services
801 S. Washington, Naperville, IL 60540 • (630) 527-3000

Naperville • Plainfield • Bolingbrook • Oswego • Woodridge
Site Map Nav Spacer Privacy Practices Nav Spacer Terms of Use
© 2014 Edward Hospital & Health Services